(Created page with "(apologies to any Bob Dylan fans reading this...) As anyone who knows about different alphabets could tell you, just because a Cyrillic character happens to bear a (coinciden...")
 
 
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For instance, Р is called "rtsui" and hence in Latin terms is an R, not the P it superficially resembles. Likewise, и is "ishe" and thus an I, and й is "ishe breve" ("short Cyrillic i") and thus an ï.
 
For instance, Р is called "rtsui" and hence in Latin terms is an R, not the P it superficially resembles. Likewise, и is "ishe" and thus an I, and й is "ishe breve" ("short Cyrillic i") and thus an ï.
   
Do some research next time (e.g. Wikipedia or Google) before spouting of on a subject you clearly know nothing about.<ac_metadata title="Don&#039;t criticise what you can&#039;t understand"> </ac_metadata>
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Do some research next time (e.g. Wikipedia or Google) before spouting off on a subject you clearly know nothing about.<ac_metadata title="Don&#039;t criticise what you can&#039;t understand"> </ac_metadata>

Latest revision as of 13:58, 5 October 2019

(apologies to any Bob Dylan fans reading this...)

As anyone who knows about different alphabets could tell you, just because a Cyrillic character happens to bear a (coincidental) resemblance to a Latin one, that doesn't mean that they are equivalent; Cyrillic is based on Greek, not Latin.

For instance, Р is called "rtsui" and hence in Latin terms is an R, not the P it superficially resembles. Likewise, и is "ishe" and thus an I, and й is "ishe breve" ("short Cyrillic i") and thus an ï.

Do some research next time (e.g. Wikipedia or Google) before spouting off on a subject you clearly know nothing about.<ac_metadata title="Don't criticise what you can't understand"> </ac_metadata>

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